Days of infamy thesis

I think Gilliam is spot on here. Spielberg is an immensely talented filmmaker, from a technical standpoint, but he doesn’t make great films because he lacks in artistic vision and creativity. Kubrick was a much better artist than Spielberg, as Gilliam is. Brazil is more creative and intellectually challenging than any film Spielberg has ever made. Spielberg is an entertainer and Gilliam and Kubrick are artists, for the most part. Saving Private Ryan is the perfect film for me to make an entertainment vs art comparison. The Thin Red Line came out the same year as Saving Private Ryan. Saving Private Ryan is entertainment and The Thin Red Line is art. One must only watch the two to easily discover the difference. I sense that Gilliam vastly prefers The Thin Red Line and that Kubrick probably did to.

But despite Hollywood's near-complete refusal to acknowledge it, ancient Rome was the original melting pot . See, back then, color and prejudice weren't linked -- unlike racism and stupidity today. Rome even had at least two African emperors, Severus and Macrinus . Rome was unique in the ancient world for its inclusive citizenship. In the past, a city-state like Sparta might have conquered a people and enslaved or slaughtered them all. Rome, on the other hand, blew ancient people's minds by assimilating or even naturalizing the conquered. The ancient Romans didn't even force conquered peoples to give up their own languages or customs.

When William Wilberforce, a member of the British Parliament, converted to Christianity, he began to earnestly seek to reform the evils he found within himself and the world around him. One of the glaring moral issues of the day was slavery, and after reading up on the subject and meeting with anti-slavery activists, Wilberforce became convinced that God was calling him to be an abolitionist. Wilberforce decided to concentrate on ending the slave trade rather than slavery itself, reasoning that the abolition of one would logically lead to the demise of the other. On May 12, 1789, Wilberforce made his first speech on the abolition of the slave trade before the House of Commons. He passionately made his case for why the trade was reprehensible and needed to cease. Wilberforce introduced a bill to abolish the trade, but it failed, a result he would become quite familiar with in the ensuing years. Yet Wilberforce never gave up, reintroducing the bill year after year, and the Slave Trade Act was finally passed in 1807.

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    Days of infamy thesis

    days of infamy thesis

  • Popular Posts
    • Inside Neverland Ranch
    • Saying Goodbye to Neverland and Michael Jackson
    • An Abandoned Skyscraper: The Pac Bell Building
    • Abandoned: Six Flags New Orleans
    • Abandoned Hotels of the Catskills Borscht Belt
    • Adventures in the Abandoned Ships of Suisun Bay
    • An Abandoned Amusement Park in Berlin
    • Discovering the History of a Titan I Base
    • The Jackling House Showdown
  • Subscribe to Blog via Email Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

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