Stanford phd thesis archive

The Registrar's Office in conjunction with the Stanford University Library offer students the option to submit their dissertation/thesis in electronic format. This electronic submission process is free of charge to students and allows them the ability to log into Axess and check their pre-submission requirements in the eDissertation/eThesis Center under the academics tab. Once these requirements have been met the "Proceed to Dissertation/Thesis Submission page" button will open up in the student eDissertation/eThesis center and this will allow the student proceed and upload a soft copy of their dissertation/thesis.

Days later, Cliff Pickover highlighted a curious factoid: When Nash wrote his . thesis in 1950, "Non Cooperative Games" at Princeton University, the dissertation (you can read it online  here) was brief. It ran only 26 pages. And more particularly, it was light on citations. Nash's diss cited two texts: One was written by John von Neumann & Oskar Morgenstern, whose book,  Theory of Games and Economic Behavior   (1944), essentially created game theory and revolutionized the field of economics; the other cited text, "Equilibrium Points in n-Person Games,"  was an article written by Nash himself. And it laid the foundation for his dissertation, another seminal work in the development of game theory, for which Nash won the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 1994 .

Stanford phd thesis archive

stanford phd thesis archive

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