Who has the right to vote essay

Voting rights for African Americans, Native Americans, and other ethnic minorities continued to be suppressed throughout the first half of the twentieth century, especially in areas that had sizable minority populations. However, legal barriers erected against certain ethnic minorities gaining citizen gradually began to be removed in the 1940s, and black voter registration in the South began to modestly increase (from 3 percent in 1940 to 13 percent in 1947). But resistance to black voter registration in the South was savage -- infamously, three civil rights volunteers who were registering black voters in Mississippi in 1964 were murdered by local members of the white supremacist Ku Klux Klan, and a year later local police in Selma, Alabama attacked a peaceful march in support for voting rights (itself held in response to an Alabama state trooper killing an unarmed voting rights activist).

Who has the right to vote essay

who has the right to vote essay

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